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29+ of the Best Cliffs in Ireland: That are NOT the Cliffs of Moher

Most of those planning a trip to Ireland will have the mighty Cliffs of Moher high up on their bucket list. And, all for a good reason. The famous cliffs are visited by over 5 million people each year and they are the backdrop for many iconic movies such as Harry Potter and Leap Year. And while the Cliffs of Moher are a must-see on any trip to the Emerald Isle, there are many wonderful cliffs in Ireland that deserve the same level of love. So, if you are looking to dive a little further off Ireland’s beaten path then look no further because this is the ultimate local guide to the Best Cliffs in Ireland.

Cliffs of Moher, County Clare, Ireland

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Best Cliffs in Ireland
Best Cliffs in Ireland

1. Hag’s Head Cliffs, County Clare, Ireland

Ok, so I couldn’t resist putting Hag’s Head first on the list.

Technically, this Cliff is part of the Cliffs of Moher. However, it is far less known and a great way to escape the crowds. For those of you visiting Ireland for the first time, consider arriving here instead of the visitor centre. Because a little known fact about the Cliffs of Moher is you don’t need to pay to visit them.

It is also the perfect spot for those looking to visit the Cliffs on a budget.

You can park your car in a family-run car park located just a 5-minute walk from Hag’s Head. This will cost you €3 per car. Please note that cards are not accepted.

The trail itself is 5.6km long. It takes around 1.5 to 2 hours to reach the Cliffs of Moher visitor centre. From there, you can walk back along the Cliff edge towards Hag’s Head. Or, order a local taxi.

The walk isn’t overly difficult, it can however become narrow in places. Therefore, it is important to walk away from the Cliffside when possible.

Related Post: How to get to the Cliffs of Moher from Galway

Mizen Head Cliff, County Cork, Ireland
Mizen Head Cliff, County Cork, Ireland

2. Mizen Head Cliff, County Cork, Ireland

Mizen Head is a must stop for those looking for things to do in West Cork.

It costs €7.50 to enter and believe me it is worth every penny.

Visitors typically spend 1 to 2 hours exploring the beauty of the area.

Mizen Head is known for its dramatic cliffside scenery, iconic bridge and crashing waves beneath.

As you make your way through the beautiful coastal area you will be presented with breathtaking views every few minutes.


Portacloy Cliff, County Mayo, Ireland
Portacloy Cliff, County Mayo, Ireland

3. Portacloy Cliff Walk, County Mayo, Ireland

For such a small country, Ireland sure does have it’s fair share of cliffs, with the next on on the list being the beautiful Portacloy Cliff Walk in County Mayo.

This trail is one of Ireland’s best-kept secrets. It is home to breathtaking beaches, crystal clear waters and striking cliffside views.

The looped trail is 18km in total and takes just over 4 hours to complete.

Don’t let the walks time deter you. It is possible to return back towards Portacloy beach at any point throughout the walk.

There are many things that make Portacloy Cliff Walk one of the best in Ireland including Free parking onsite, fewer crowds and an end-of-hike swimming option.


Bray to Graystones Cliff, Wicklow, Ireland
Bray to Graystones Cliff, Wicklow, Ireland

4. Bray to Graystones Cliff, Wicklow, Ireland

Next on the list for famous cliffs in Ireland is none other than the Bray to Greystones Cliff Walk.

This is one of the most popular Cliff walks on Ireland’s East Coast.

The walk is 7.5km in total and takes around 1 hour and 30 minutes to complete.

Once you reach the coastal town of Greystones, you can return to Bray via DART or retrace your steps.

The walks aren’t overly difficult, however, it is important to take distance into consideration.

The Bray to Greystones Cliff walk is a popular trail for those looking to take a day trip from Dublin. The beginning of the trail (Bray promenade) is just a short 45 minute DART ride from Dublin City Center.


Slieve League Cliffs, County Donegal, Ireland
Slieve League Cliffs, County Donegal, Ireland

5. Slieve League Cliffs, County Donegal, Ireland

Next on the list (and my personal favourite) is the mighty Slieve League Cliffs in County Donegal.

These cliffs soar 601 metres above sea level and are 3 times the size of the Cliffs of Moher.

The trail is 2.8 kilometres in length and can be difficult in places.

If you do decide to take part in the full hike allow for 3/4 hours to complete it.

You will not regret a visit to Slieve League. The Cliffs are like a backdrop to a Mac Screensaver.

They have recently started to charge for parking at Slieve League.

It cost €5 euro and adds an extra 30 minutes onto the walk. However, I have been there twice since the charge came in and they have allowed me to drive right up to the initial viewpoint for the same price.

Slieve League naming comes from the Irish Language meaning ‘Grey Mountain’ in English.


Magheracross Viewpoint Cliffs, County Antrim
Magheracross Viewpoint Cliffs, County Antrim

6. Magheracross Viewpoint Cliffs, County Antrim

One of my favourite spots along the Causeway Coastal route is the new Magheracross Cliff Viewpoint.

The newly renovated boardwalk allows visitors to walk along a circle platform to take in the epic views of Antrim’s Coastline.

It is a nice place to take a moment and appreciate the natural beauty around you.

To the right, there is another platform that offers amazing views of Dunluce Castle and the surrounding cliffs.

Parking is FREE on-site with plenty of car spaces available.


Kerry Cliffs, County Kerry, Ireland
Kerry Cliffs, County Kerry, Ireland

7. Kerry Cliffs, County Kerry, Ireland

The Kerry Cliffs are completely underrated. Perhaps, it is due to their location.

These spectacular cliffs are located on the Skellig Ring, which is located beneath the famous Ring of Kerry.

The Cliffs soar 300 metres above sea level and offer a rugged and raw appearance.

It costs €4 to park your car and enter the cliffs. There are many viewpoints along the way.

I’d advise spending an hour to an hour and a half exploring the Cliffs beauty.

One of the best things about the Kerry Cliffs is the low crowd levels. This gives you the opportunity to appreciate the surrounding beauty without distractions.


Croaghaun Cliffs, Achill Island, County Mayo, Ireland
Croaghaun Cliffs, Achill Island, County Mayo, Ireland

8. Croaghaun Cliffs, Achill Island, County Mayo, Ireland

If you are in search of the Best Cliff Walks in Ireland then look no further because Croaghan is the one to add to your bucket list.

Croaghan is the highest sea cliff in Ireland and the third highest in Europe. They soar 688m above sea level and offer insane views from the top.

These magnificent cliffs are located at Keem Bay on Achill Island in County Mayo.

There are many different hiking trails to choose from. They all range in difficulty but require a moderate level of fitness to complete.

The walking routes can take anywhere from 1 to 4 hours depending on what trail you decide to take.

Parking is free at Keem Bay, it can, however, get rather busy in the summer months. It is common for the Guards to revoke access to the road once the beach has reached capacity. Therefore, it is important to arrive at Keem nice and early in the morning to avoid disappointment.


Loop Head Cliffs, County Clare, Ireland
Loop Head Cliffs, County Clare, Ireland

9. Loop Head Cliffs, County Clare, Ireland

Loop Head is one of the lesser-known things to do in Clare. However, that doesn’t make it any less beautiful.

The drive along the loop head peninsula is one of the most breathtaking in the Country.

It is a lovely place to walk along the dramatic cliff edge, have a search for the Eire sign and watch the birds fly on by.

Parking is free at Loop Head and there are plenty of spots available.

Loop Head is also one of the places used for the filming of the Star Wars movie ‘The Last Jedi’.


Baltimore Beacon Cliffs, County Cork, Ireland
Baltimore Beacon Cliffs, County Cork, Ireland

10. Baltimore Beacon Cliffs, County Cork, Ireland

Baltimore Beacon is one of my FAVOURITE places in all of Ireland. Words can not describe how beautiful it is there.

The beacon sits on top of a Cliff edge and looks out at a view of Skerkin Island.

Parking at the beacon is not an easy task, the road is narrow and there are limited spaces.

You can however walk from Baltimore town. This should take around 20 minutes in total.

The walk to the beacon isn’t overly difficult, it is, however, rocky and uneven in places. It is a good idea to wear a good pair of footwear when visiting.


Glen Beach Cliff Walk, County Wicklow, Ireland
Glen Beach Cliff Walk, County Wicklow, Ireland

11. Glen Beach Cliff Walk, County Wicklow, Ireland

Glen Beach Cliff Walk is one of my favourite places to go walking in Wicklow.

This is a trail that can easily be missed. It is nowhere near as popular as the nearby Bray to Greystones. Or destintions in the National Park, like Glendalough. Yet, shares the same level of beauty.

The walk begins along a narrow cliff path which eventually evens out into paved ground. It takes around 2 hours to walk there and back.

The walk is home to a Seal Colony and a secret lighthouse at the very end of the trail.

Parking is free on-site.


The Cliffs of Aran, County Galway, Ireland
The Cliffs of Aran, County Galway, Ireland

12. The Cliffs of Aran, County Galway, Ireland

The Cliffs of Aran are located on the largest of the three Aran Islands, Inis Mór.

There is so much to see and do on Inis Mór and the Cliffs are one of the highlights.

You can walk along the cliffside to reach the famous wormhole. Which is a natural pool shaped cutout.

This is a popular place for visitors to go for a swim. However, it is important to be vigilant as it is not the safest swimming spot.

Another great place to catch a glimpse of the Cliffs of Aran is from Dun Aonghasa. A famous ruin on the island is located on the top of another set of Cliffs.


White Cliffs of Ashleam, County Mayo, Ireland
White Cliffs of Ashleam, County Mayo, Ireland

13. The White Cliffs of Ashleam, County Mayo, Ireland

The White Cliffs of Ashleam is a fantastic place to visit for those looking to explore the beauty of Achill Island in County Mayo.

The Cliffs are located along the Atlantic Driving Root and offer amazing views of the coastal drive.

When looking up things to do in Mayo, these cliffs are often missed. Or, overshadowed by the nearby Croaghan.

Parking is free at the main viewing point, however, there are other stop-off options along the way.

The White Cliffs of Ashleam is also a great place to watch the sunset.


Mussenden Temple, County Derry
Mussenden Temple, County Derry

14. Mussenden Temple, County Derry

Mussenden Temple in County Derry is a must for anyone travelling along the causeway coast.

While this Cliff Walk is a little further up the coast than the other major attractions it is 100% worth the extra drive.

The Cliff walk takes about 1 hour to complete and offers beautiful views of the Temple and Downhill beach.

As you approach the temple you will come across an old ruin of Downhill house. This is a nice place to walkabout.

There is paid parking on-site (£5), along with toilet facilities, a coffée shop and gardens.


Dunquin Pier, County Kerry, Ireland
Dunquin Pier, County Kerry, Ireland

15. Dunquin Pier, County Kerry, Ireland

No trip to Kerry is complete without stopping by Dunquin Pier.

Located along the outstanding Slea Head Drive lies a range of Cliffs, Coastal Walks and Hidden Gems.

I’m mentioning Dunquin as the stop-off when in reality there are many cliffside views throughout the drive.

Dunquin however is the most popular spot. Take a moment to enjoy the raw rock formation and the Crystal clear water down below. You can walk down along the pier to get a closer look.

Just don’t be tempted to drive down the passage. A tourist tried this a few years back and it made the national news 😂 There is free parking on-site.


Bridges of Ross, County Clare, Ireland
Bridges of Ross, County Clare, Ireland

16. Bridges of Ross, County Clare, Ireland

The Bridges of Ross is a fun and unique place to visit for those planning a trip to County Clare.

The unusual cliff formation is located an hour and a half drive from the Cliff of Moher.

Therefore, it is the perfect starting point for those looking to spend the day exploring the county’s coastal stops.

There used to be three ‘bridges’ in total. However, there is only one still standing today.

It takes about 5/10 minutes to walk to the bridge from the FREE car park.


Copper Coast, County Waterford, Ireland
Copper Coast, County Waterford, Ireland

17. Copper Coast, County Waterford, Ireland

I still struggle to understand why county Waterford is not talked about more when it comes to Irish tourism.

The county is arguably one of the most beautiful places in the country.

Particularly, along the Copper Coast, where you will find a range of beautiful cliffs looking out into the ocean.

Waterford is said to be one of the Counties in Ireland that gets the most sunshine throughout the year.

There isn’t one particular cliff I want to mention because most views along this coastal drive are from a cliff edge.


Old Head of Kinsale, County Cork, Ireland
Old Head of Kinsale, County Cork, Ireland

18. Old Head of Kinsale, County Cork, Ireland

The Old Head of Kinsale is often the first or last stop for those travelling along Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way.

And oh boy! It does not disappoint.

When you visit you are almost guaranteed to get up close and personal with that famous wind that every so kindly lives on the west coast of Ireland.

Therefore it is important to pack accordingly for Ireland’s unpredictable weather.

It is not possible to walk to the end of the head. You can however walk alongside the cliff edge to the right.

There is also free parking, toilet facilities and a coffee shop on-site.


Bromore Cliffs, County Kerry, Ireland
Bromore Cliffs, County Kerry, Ireland

19. Bromore Cliffs, County Kerry, Ireland

Another hidden gem in Ireland is the beautiful Bromore Cliffs in County Kerry.

These Cliffs are well and truly off the beaten path. So, much so, when I visited in the summer months I had the whole place to myself.

One important thing to note is that the hedge surrounding the cliffs is rather high. So, if you are a small human like me you will only be able to see the Cliffs from the viewpoints.

Either way, they a still worth the visit.

Parking cost €5, I recommend spending 1/2 hours here exploring the beauty of the cliffs.


Howth Cliff Walk, County Dublin, Ireland
Howth Cliff Walk, County Dublin, Ireland

20. Howth Cliff Walk, County Dublin, Ireland

One of my favourite walks in Dublin is the beautiful Howth Cliff Walk.

This stunning trail takes anywhere from 2/3 hours to complete depending on your fitness levels.

It is the perfect addition to a Dublin itinerary.

The walk is home to amazing views of Dublin’s coastline. On a clear day, you can see Poolbeg Chimney’s, the Great Sugar Loaf and the city skyline.

The Howth Cliff path is also a fantastic place to watch the sunrise or sunset in Dublin.

Howth is quite easy to get too by either taking a bus, train or taxi from the city cente.


The Giants Causeway, County Antrim, Ireland
The Giants Causeway, County Antrim, Ireland

21. The Giants Causeway, County Antrim, Ireland

The Giants Causeway is one of the most iconic tourist attractions on the Island of Ireland.

The visit to see the unique basalt columns are a must on any Ireland road trip.

When you visit the Causeway you can walk along two cliff edges. The first is the red rocks located to the right of the Giants Boot.

The second is the higher cliff which presents visitors with a Birdseye view of the causeway.

If you would like to learn more about the different walks, parking and facilities on-site please check out my Giants Causeway post.


Georges Head, County Clare, Ireland
Georges Head, County Clare, Ireland

22. Georges Head, County Clare, Ireland

Georges Head is a cliff walk that I accidentally stubbled upon when taking a wrong turn out of the town Killkee in County Clare.

This is a spot I am so happy I came across. The looped walk takes about 1 hour to complete and it sits adjacent to the Killkee Golf Course.

I was mesmerised by the crazy ways crashing beneath.

This is a lovely place to visit if you want to explore some of Ireland’s hidden gems.

There is free parking on-site and the walk is not too difficult.


 Portrane, County Dublin, Ireland
Portrane, County Dublin, Ireland

23. Donabate to Portrane Cliff Walk, County Dublin, Ireland

If you are looking for something unusual to do in Dublin then consider going on the Donabate to Portrane Cliff Walk.

This is a wonderful walk that is home to beautiful views of Dublin’s Coastline.

Please note, at times, this walk is closed off to the public due to landslides. There will however, be many signs warning you of the dangers.

On Donabate beach there is a cave that you can enter when the tide is low.

This is a beautiful spot to visit for sunrise.

There is free parking on-site.


Kilkee Cliffs, County Clare, Ireland
Kilkee Cliffs, County Clare, Ireland

24. Kilkee Cliffs, County Clare, Ireland

The Kilkee Cliffs are located in the same County as the Cliffs of Moher, yet, they are not nearly as known.

Clare is home to a range of beautiful cliffside views. It is the perfect county for those looking to go on a short coastal road trip.

The walk at Kilkee Cliffs is a short 2 kilmeters and takes 20/30 minutes to complete.

Therefore, it is the perfect walk for all fitness levels. Just be careful as the ground is uneven in places.

There is free parking on-site with plenty of car spaces.


Fogher Cliffs, County Kerry, Ireland
Fogher Cliffs, County Kerry, Ireland

25. Fogher Cliffs, County Kerry, Ireland

The Fogher Cliffs are located on Valentia Island in County Kerry.

The Island is easy to access via car so don’t let that deter you from visiting the beautiful cliffs and Geokaun Mountain.

It is possible to walk around the park or drive to each stop.

Entrance cost’s €5 euro per car.

Once you reach the top of the mountain you will be presented with 360 views of Valentia Island.

It is also an outstanding place to watch the sunset and let the world go on by.


Galley Head, County Cork, Ireland
Galley Head, County Cork, Ireland

26. Galley Head, County Cork, Ireland

Last but not least on our Cliff walks in Ireland post is the wonderful Galley Head in County Cork.

Again, this is a lesser-known attraction in Ireland. Usually, a walk that only locals visit.

And while the cliffs are not overly large I wanted to include this spot in the post for one particular reason.

As we walked along the coastal trail we came across what I can only describe as a wormhole.

A hole in the land that pushed water through from the ocean.

It was quite an unusual sight. It can be seen to the right of the image of Galley head.

There is free parking on-site.


27. Cloughmore Cliffs, Achill Island, Mayo, Ireland

These beautiful cliffs can easily be missed as they are not marked on google maps.

They are located off to the side of Achill’s Atlantic Driving route about a 2-minutes from Cloughmore Viewpoint.

It is difficult to explain their exact location but as you drive pay attention to the shape of the coastline. When you notice the sea getting closer to the road (with a dramatic drop off), pull in your car somewhere safe and go for an exploration.

When you reach the dramatic drop off walk to the right- of it as if you are continuing on towards the coast. You will soon see two pieces of abandoned machinery. There was no indication of where they came from or how long they have been there but they appeared to be rather rusted.

From that point, you will be able to see these beautiful cliffs. For the sake of this blog post, I am going to call them Cloughmore Cliffs. Although, I’m not sure if they have been officially named.


28. Dún Dúchathair ( the Black fort)

Words can not describe how rugged and mighty these cliffs are. Located on a completely underrated part of Inis Mór (the largest Aran Island) lies Dún Dúchathair known in English as the Black Fort.

This is an area that feels so raw, untouched by civilisation excluding the odd local or two. And perhaps some tourists like us who happen to discover it!

On the side of the cliff sits an old ruin, well, half a ruin. I can only presume the rest of it was lost in years of erosion.

The name comes from the unique aspect of this area, the dark-coloured limestone. Following a similar texture/pattern to the rest of the rocks on the island yet differ greatly in colour.


29. The Gobbins Cliff Walk

The Gobbins Cliff Walk is one of the most unique coastal experiences in Ireland. Located in Islandmagee, County Antrim, Northern Ireland, is undoubtedly a must-visit attraction for those seeking an exhilarating outdoor adventure.

Walk along the cliff edge on a secure platform that hangs over the sea. This experience is not for the faint hearted.

Visitors are offered the unique opportunity to explore the rugged beauty of Northern Ireland’s coast up close.

Take in the breathtaking views of the Irish Sea, observe fascinating local wildlife, and learn about the region’s rich geology and history.

It’s an immersive experience that offers a truly unique perspective of Ireland’s natural beauty.

Visit The Gobbins Cliff Walk for more information and to plan your visit.


30. Saltee Island Cliffs, Wexford

Ok, so I could find an official name for the cliffs on the Saltee Island but I couldn’t resist adding it to my list of Cliffs in Ireland.

This rugged island off the coast of Wexford is one of my FAVOURITE places to visit in the Country.

The landscapes are out of this world, and if you so happen to visit on a summer day it will make you feel as if you are somewhere tropical.

And that’s not the best part, the island is also home to an array of birds. Including the incredibly cute puffins. I recommend visiting in late April, May or June to increase your chances of seeing them.

The only way to the island is by boat and I recommend booking in advance.


Cliffs in Ireland FAQ

What are the famous cliffs in Ireland?

The most famous cliff in Ireland is undoubtedly the Cliffs of Moher. Stretching for about 14 kilometres along the Atlantic coast of County Clare in the west of Ireland, the Cliffs of Moher stand as a stunning natural spectacle.

They reach their highest point at Knockardakin, just north of O’Brien’s Tower, where they rise to a remarkable 214 meters (702 feet). Each year, the cliffs pull in hordes of people who can’t resist the combo of jaw-dropping scenery, a deep-rooted past and an array of critters to spot.

What are the tallest Cliffs in Ireland?

The tallest cliffs in Ireland are the Croaghaun Cliffs on Achill Island. They’re extremely high, reaching up to 688 meters (2,257 feet). So, yes significantly higher than the Cliffs of Moher.

This ranks them as the third tallest maritime cliffs in all of Europe. Located on the western tip of the island, the cliffs aren’t all too easy to access but are worth the hike on a summer’s day.

Yet, let’s not overlook Achill Island, brimming with untamed beauty and bustling wildlife.

Where are the white Cliffs of Ireland?

Ireland has two white cliffs, the White Cliffs of Ashleam on Achill Island and the White Cliffs at Magheracross in County Antrim, NI.

The White Cliffs of Ashleam are far more accessible than Croaghaun, located on the looped Atlantic Drive. These striking coastal edges, characterized by their stark white colour, significantly contribute to the island’s diverse and enthralling landscape.

the White Cliffs at Magheracross have a striking bright white appearance, creating a dramatic contrast against the blue ocean waves and the green Irish landscape. To the right of them lies an incredible view of Dunluce Castle.

In your opinion, what’s the top spot for cliffs in Ireland?

In my opinion, the nicest cliffs in Ireland are the Kerry Cliffs. Located in Portmagee, County Kerry, these cliffs present an unparalleled, majestic view. Like no other in Ireland.

Soaring over a thousand feet above the Atlantic, these cliffs give you an epic, sweeping view of both Skellig and Puffin Islands.

The combination of raw natural beauty and the serene tranquillity of the surroundings truly sets the Kerry Cliffs apart as one of Ireland’s most stunning landscapes.

What is the 2nd highest cliffs in Ireland?

The second highest cliffs in Ireland are the Slieve League Cliffs, located on the southwest coast of County Donegal.

These imposing cliffs, also known as Sliabh Liag, rise dramatically from the Atlantic Ocean to a peak height of approximately 601 meters (1972 feet), making them nearly three times higher than the more famous Cliffs of Moher.

Gazing out from the peak, your eyes are treated to a stunning spectacle of endless Atlantic waters stretching into infinity. You can get to these cliffs by hiking, and trust me, if you’re a thrill-seeker, this will give you the rush you crave.

What famous cliffs are in Galway?

A lot of tourists presume that the famous Cliffs of Moher are in County Galway, however, coastal landscapes are rather flat compared to other counties, with the only notable cliffs being the Cliffs of Aran on the island of Inis Mór.

Instead, the Cliffs of Moher are Located at the southwestern edge of the Burren region in County Clare, however, it is easy to reach the cliffs from Galway.

Are there Cliffs near Dublin?

Yes, there are cliffs in Dublin. They are called the Howth Cliffs and are a popular day trip from the city. They are not too high, but they are very beautiful. You can walk along a path at the top and look out at the sea. On a day with clear skies, the cliff tops offer breathtaking sights that extend all the way to the distant Wicklow Mountains.

Escaping the city’s non-stop buzz to unwind is a top-notch choice. I recommend visiting the Sutton side of the cliffs if you are hoping to catch the sunset while in Dublin.

What city is closest to the Cliffs of Moher?

While Doolin’s the nearest town to the Cliffs of Moher, Galway’s is the closest city with it’s buzzing arts vibe and a whole load of history. They also offer regular day trip options to the cliffs.

However, the small town that is actually closest to the Cliffs is Doolin. But Doolin, known for traditional Irish music, is a charming coastal town that makes an excellent home base for tourists visiting the Cliffs of Moher.

If you are planning on visiting the cliffs and want to stay in a city, I recommend staying in Galway rather than Dublin. Dublin is over 3 hours away, and while there is many day trip options to choose from, I wouldn’t advise doing them unless you are really stuck for time and using the capital as a base.

Where are Slieve cliffs?

You’ll find the breathtaking Slieve League Cliffs, often simply called the Slieve Cliffs, nestled in Ireland’s County Donegal.

Are there Cliffs near Cork Ireland?

Yes, there are cliffs near Cork, Ireland. If you’re near Cork City, don’t miss the Old Head of Kinsale – it’s a stunning stretch of rugged coastline that’ll blow your mind.

If you’re roaming around West Cork, don’t miss Mizen Head – it’s the most south-westerly tip of Ireland and an absolute must-see.

Visiting this place is truly a unique experience – you’ve got an epic bridge crossing a huge chasm and these killer views of the Atlantic that you won’t forget.

What cliffs in Ireland are in Harry Potter?

The Cliffs of Moher are used as a backdrop in “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince”, specifically in the scene where Harry and Dumbledore are searching for a Horcrux.

The Cliffs of Moher make a totally awesome backdrop for Harry Potter because it’s like you’re seeing Hogwarts brought to life.

Loads of series buffs make the trip to these cliffs, chasing that feeling they got when they first saw them in the movie.

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